Avoid The Droop This Valentine's Day: Keep Your Roses 50 Shades of Red

Top tips on how to make your bunch of roses last longer

Bunches of cut flowers will always have a limited life. In order to satisfy the huge demand required on one day, the flowers are often placed in cold storage for a few days (or more), so may not be at their freshest. Gareth Cowmeadow, Scenting Specialist at Ambius, advises the lucky recipients of Valentine's roses to take a leaf out of the book of a famous Mr Grey and treat them with passion.

Take off their shoes - During the time since the stems were cut, they may have formed a callous over the cut end, which might slow down water uptake. Use secateurs or a sharp knife to cut the bottom centimetre or so from the stem to expose some fresher tissue.

Strip from the waist down - If you are going to put your roses in a vase, the lower leaves will get wet and look unsightly. It’s best to remove them, but make sure you leave a few near the top to help show off the attractive blooms.

Ply them with fertile food - Bouquets of flowers usually come with a little sachet of fertilizer. This is beneficial, so don’t throw it away as it will add a few extra days of life to your flowers.

Give them a sensual warm bath - Try not to chill your flowers by putting them in icy water. If the water out of your tap is very cold, fill the vase and let it warm up a little before putting your flowers in.